zzzzzz

archiemcphee:

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.

Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.

The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).

Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.

Photos by Rosie Hallam

[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]

(via monster-hugs)

— 12 hours ago with 1135 notes
lindafong:

Drew a bunch of lily pads too…

lindafong:

Drew a bunch of lily pads too…

(via marazione)

— 1 day ago with 1282 notes

kylefewell:

tinycartridge:

The most beautiful Game Boys ⊟

I love, love, love these. I am SO tempted to pick one up and throw on a front light mod, then not play any other console for the rest of my life.

These gorgeous floral paintjobs come from Georgina, who makes and sells customized portables through her friend’s shop. If you want to commission something like this from Georgina, hit up her Tumblr.

BUY Game Boy games, upcoming releases

wowie

— 1 day ago with 2573 notes
#gameboy  #art  #dang 
DIM. E CRES. 13 F/W HOLIDAY

(Source: 7ae, via marazione)

— 1 week ago with 4189 notes
#fashion 

sammyharkham:

I am slowly making progress on Blood of the Virgin, the book length comic I have been working on for YEARS. Maybe it will be completed next year. To help stay on course with the book, I have given dozens of drawings, illustrations, and original comic pages to The Beguiling who will be selling them in person at Comic Con this weekend at the Drawn & Quarterly booth. These are pieces that are not online yet, and in some cases, I have held onto for a while. Sales through them help me continue on Blood of the Virgin. so if you’re at the show, take a look. Maybe you’ll like something enough to buy it. If you aren’t going to the show, you can look at my earlier Beguiling list of originals here or contact me directly if you want something not listed, or want to commission something or hire me for an illustration or a dick/tit tattoo. All Price ranges. We can work it out. samharkham AT gmail DOT com.

It is all very appreciated. 

Above are some in-progress pages from the book, before scanning, color, and clean-up. Judge lightly.

— 1 week ago with 399 notes
#comics 

sunbakerey:

THE STATE OF THE REYYY 2014 / 2015

(prepare for many wordings ahead)

I am working on a lot of projects! If you’re an old fan or a new fan, it may be challenging to keep up! I’ma go thru the LIST of what I’m currently working on and what you can expect from me in 2014 and 2015! Very excited! (the following list corresponds with the images above in numeric order!)

  • ACCEL

Written by acclaimed comics writer Joe Casey, drawn by me and colors by Dylan McCrae, ACCEL is my first original Superhero comic project. Accel is a speedster hero (in the tradition of The Flash, Quicksilver, etc), with some awesome twists of his own, including my brand of hyper crazy fluid artwork. If you enjoyed the Quicksilver sequences in X-Men: Days of Future Past, you just MAY enjoy Accel! Accel is published by Lion Forge Comics, and will be debuting extremely soon. I believe it will start in digital format, then transition to print later. Anyway, this will be my most regular comic series for the foreseeable next few months!

  • GAME CHANGER

Game Changer is a collection of my older PENG! comic— which is a comic about super Advanced Kickball. It’s basically like Shaolin Soccer meets kickball, but with kids instead of adults. GAME CHANGER will collect the original PENG! kickball story, along with new “fringe sports”-themed stories, including a story about HACKEY SACK and another one about BREAKDANCING (called “FREEZE" which you can see a preview of HERE!!!!!). Game Changer will be coming out in 2015. I’d like to get it out in time for Emerald City Comic Con 2015— we’ll see! 

  • DREAM SKILLS

Dream Skills is about a city that has outlawed guns, and instead all disputes are solved with SWORDS. But it goes even a bit deeper than that, as Sword Activity is regulated into such a way that slicing and cleaving is not necessarily a GIVEN. Anyway, it’s mostly about two girls dealing with this SWORD WORLD, coffee shops, wi-fi and dickhead baristas— but with swords. I’m chipping away at this one and it will appear in some form by 2015 for sure— perhaps digital, .pdf, patreon’d, I’m not sure!

  • STREET KNUCKLE

This is a brand new project. In the wake of my awesome experience making Arem (my Metroid-tribute comic, see below), I feel I need to make more Tribute Comics. Street Knuckle is a Final Fight / Street Fighter / Fatal Fury mashup. Basically a tribute to BRAWLER games— but of course, with a twist. I’m still mapping this project out, but it’s quickly becoming a front running absolute favorite of mine. It’s not JUST for gamers, or fans familiar with these games— it’s like a commentary about being strong in our modern world… SO YEAH. The goal for this one (if nothing else), is to have it ready for Emerald City Comic Con 2015. Probably my “big new project” of that convention!!! ! ! 

  • SHARKNIFE 3

OKAYYYYY… Sharknife 3. If you didn’t already know, I have two graphic novels already out, that I’m mostly “known” for. I’ve been working on the third volume for a couple years now…  To be perfectly honest, the pages I have done for Sharknife 3 at this point— while FUN— are not representative of where I’m at with my expression / comics / storytelling right now. I feel I’ve evolved a lot since Sharknife 2, etc. So Sharknife 3 as it is right now, is on indefinite hiatus. I MAY finish the pages for this and release it at some point? But to be frank again; I have much loftier plans for Sharknife, a “re-invention” for the character, that I’d probably like to get into more. We’ll see what happens with Sharknife! I never knew what I was doing with Sharknife. Sharknife aint no Scott Pilgrim, Sharknife is more like a THB (Paul Pope). I just go with the flow of it. Annoying for fans, publishers, retailers maybe— but essential for this artist. 

  • SUN BAKERY

The last year’s project. It’s done! It’s for Kickstarter backers! It will start being sent out extremely soon! I might do another kickstarter to reprint it if more people want it? Stay tuned. 

  • AREM

Still probably my most favorite comic I’ve drawn in a while. It’s a Metroid tribute comic with a bit more substance to it than just that. It’s available in digital .pdf format right HERE so get on that if you like :3 

TL;DR

I am a scatterbrained creator, I know. I’ve always considered myself a “comics ninja”— in that I rarely have a “set method” to making my comics, more like I adapt and go on instinct. So a lot of these projects are short stories to get my art rocks off. They aren’t projects made for comic shops, or monthly readers, they are “art moments” that I like to create at my liesure, for the betterment of my artisthood and the people who take the time to enjoy and seek them out :3 

THE FUTURE

BUT, I am working toward a huge, solid comics push with a BRAND NEW, FOCUSED, MINI-SERIES project (unnanounced) headed your way, after all these, in 2015. Something the “mainstream comics populace” at large can easily keep their eyes on. Yes… 

! ! 

I am super pumped to be making all this art, and for you to look at and maybe enjoy it. Stay with me, it’s gonna be a good time :3 

* * * * * 

(Feel free to reblog the art in this post and delete my ramblings if u want i dont care ;])

— 1 week ago with 376 notes
#comics 
wheelr:

guttersnipercomics:

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script
"Notes as follows:
1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.
2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.
3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.
4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.
5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.
6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.
7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.
8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:
CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.
CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.
CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.
CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.
CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.
9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:
NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.
CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”
CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.
10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.
11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.
12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.
13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”
- Nate Piekos
http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

This is in fact the format I use, and one that I know is being passed around by writers both professional and aspiring. It’s an excellent, intuitive format.

wheelr:

guttersnipercomics:

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script

"Notes as follows:

1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.

2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.

3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.

4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.

5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.

6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.

7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.

8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:

CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.

CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.

CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.

CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.

CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.

9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:

NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.

CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”

CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.

10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.

11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.

12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.

13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”

- Nate Piekos

http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

This is in fact the format I use, and one that I know is being passed around by writers both professional and aspiring. It’s an excellent, intuitive format.

(via spx)

— 1 week ago with 714 notes
#comics 

samehat:

brettpunk:

tcannoncomics:

I am lucky to have a copy of Brutus Magazine’s special Katsuhiro Otomo issue.  I thought it’d be nice to share the wealth.  The magazine is full of tons of awesome pictures of Otomo’s work, Otomo in the studio, and even Otomo hanging out with Takehiko Inoue.  How cool is that?  One really cool thing is a few pages of shelfie’s (I included his movie collection here).

The magazine also came with a short comic by Otomo called Park, which I included a few pages of.

 Unfortunately, I can’t read japanese, so I need a friend to come and translate the whole thing for me.  They could read it to me like a bedtime story.  Otomo is a huge inspiration and I’ll add this beauty to my collection of his stuff.  More rare Otomo to come later!

OTOMO OTOMO OTOMO

thanks for sharing

— 1 week ago with 351 notes

davidhine:

Amazing illustrations by Tatsuyuki Tanaka. I came across his work in a book called Cannabis Works. All I know about him is that he has worked in animation - notably Akira. There doesn’t seem to be much of his art out there besides Cannabis Works and even that seems to be out of print. I would love to see more of his work if anyone has any links.

(via samehat)

— 1 week ago with 15344 notes
vangoe:

my coded watermelon icy-pole

vangoe:

my coded watermelon icy-pole

(via thetarrpit)

— 1 week ago with 7250 notes